Willow Glen, May 2017 (detail)
Willow Glen, May 2017 (detail)

This 12-month project chronicles the neighborhoods of San Jose, California, through portraits made monthly with, and of, yard waste.

Each month I visit a different neighborhood, gleaning specimens from a pile of yard waste stacked at the curb side. This practice provides a biologically nutrient-filled smorgasbord of information about what we are growing, discarding, our labor, and our land. 

Using the specimens themselves to make the majority of the marks, I push, pull, and twist the ink, revealing something fundamental and perhaps forgotten about the interface between person and plant. 

The city of San Jose generously maintains a weekly tradition of collecting "yard trimmings" from all participating residents. The trimmings must be swept into a tidy pile at the curb, ready for pickup:  Bermuda grass, Oleander, Hibiscus, Juniper, Palm, Birch, Jacaranda, Nasturtium, and Bottlebrush.

Willow Glen, May 2017
Willow Glen, May 2017
Willow Glen, May 2017 (detail)
Willow Glen, May 2017 (detail)
Willow Glen, May 2017 (detail)
Willow Glen, May 2017 (detail)
Cambrian, June 2017
Cambrian, June 2017
Cambrian, June 2017 (detail)
Cambrian, June 2017 (detail)
Cambrian, July 2017 (detail)
Cambrian, July 2017 (detail)
Evergreen, July 2017
Evergreen, July 2017
Evergreen, July 2017 (detail)
Evergreen, July 2017 (detail)
Evergreen, July 2017 (detail)
Evergreen, July 2017 (detail)
Evergreen, July 2017 (detail)
Evergreen, July 2017 (detail)
Willow Glen, May 2017 (detail)
Willow Glen, May 2017
Willow Glen, May 2017 (detail)
Willow Glen, May 2017 (detail)
Cambrian, June 2017
Cambrian, June 2017 (detail)
Cambrian, July 2017 (detail)
Evergreen, July 2017
Evergreen, July 2017 (detail)
Evergreen, July 2017 (detail)
Evergreen, July 2017 (detail)
Willow Glen, May 2017 (detail)

This 12-month project chronicles the neighborhoods of San Jose, California, through portraits made monthly with, and of, yard waste.

Each month I visit a different neighborhood, gleaning specimens from a pile of yard waste stacked at the curb side. This practice provides a biologically nutrient-filled smorgasbord of information about what we are growing, discarding, our labor, and our land. 

Using the specimens themselves to make the majority of the marks, I push, pull, and twist the ink, revealing something fundamental and perhaps forgotten about the interface between person and plant. 

The city of San Jose generously maintains a weekly tradition of collecting "yard trimmings" from all participating residents. The trimmings must be swept into a tidy pile at the curb, ready for pickup:  Bermuda grass, Oleander, Hibiscus, Juniper, Palm, Birch, Jacaranda, Nasturtium, and Bottlebrush.

Willow Glen, May 2017
Willow Glen, May 2017 (detail)
Willow Glen, May 2017 (detail)
Cambrian, June 2017
Cambrian, June 2017 (detail)
Cambrian, July 2017 (detail)
Evergreen, July 2017
Evergreen, July 2017 (detail)
Evergreen, July 2017 (detail)
Evergreen, July 2017 (detail)
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